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Category: Learning to Write

Routines for Writers: How to Develop a Writing Schedule and Stick to It

Posted in creativity, discipline, finding time to write, finishing your novel, Getting published, how to be a prolific writer, how to complete a novel, Learning to Write, motivation for writers, Productivity for creatives, prolific writer, Writing a novel, writing books, writing life, and Writing Tips

What’s the Most Difficult Thing About Writing? The most difficult thing about writing may be developing a workable writing schedule. Well, for most of us it isn’t coming up with ideas, plotting, characterization, story arcs, subplots or any of the nitty-gritty aspects of our craft. If we’re already…

3 Big Mistakes I Made Writing and Publishing and How You Can Avoid Them

Posted in creativity, discipline, Fiction, finishing your novel, Getting published, how to be a prolific writer, how to complete a novel, Independent Publishing, Learning to Write, Literary agents, Literature, prolific writer, Publishing, publishing your first book, Rejections, self publishing, Writing a novel, writing books, and writing mistakes

Making Mistakes is the Only Way to Learn Only three? Well, to be honest I’ve made many more than three big mistakes writing and publishing so far. I don’t doubt for a moment I’ll make many more. In fact, it’s fair to say I can always find new mistakes to…

Keeping a Journal: 7 Compelling Reasons Why Every Writer Should

Posted in creativity, discipline, finding time to write, finishing your novel, how to be a prolific writer, how to complete a novel, journaling, Learning to Write, motivation for writers, Productivity for creatives, prolific writer, writer's journal, writer's notebook, writer's workshop, Writing a novel, writing books, writing life, and Writing Tips

  Good Advice is Often Ignored To keep a journal is one of the standard pieces of advice given to every new writer. But I am always astonished by how few start keeping a journal. Keeping a writer’s journal, rather like writing every day, is one of the…

The Elements of Fiction: Is Conflict the Heart of a Story?

Posted in conflict in fiction, creativity, Fiction, genre fiction, Getting published, Learning to Write, Literature, novels, Storytelling, Writing a novel, writing books, and Writing Tips

Conflict is An Important Element of Any Story Conflict is one of the elements of fiction which no story can do without. It’s the driving force, the engine, powering and empowering drama. It doesn’t matter which medium is used – the written word, dance, music, film, a computer…

How Many Books Should a Writer Read? Can You Be a Writer if You Don’t Read?

Posted in creativity, discipline, Independent Publishing, Learning to Write, novels, Publishing, Reading, writers, Writing a novel, writing books, and Writing Tips

Reading and Writing are Two Sides of the Same Coin How many books should a writer read? The simple answer to this question is, “As many as possible.” I don’t know any successful writers who aren’t voracious readers. To me it’s a no-brainer that in order to write, and to…

How Does Symbolism Enhance a Story? Advice for Writers

Posted in creativity, how to complete a novel, Learning to Write, symbolism, Writing a novel, and Writing Tips

Symbolism and the Language of Literature I was recently asked by a reader of this blog if I could answer the question, “How does symbolism enhance a story?” It’s an interesting question and I’ll do my best to answer it. I remember very clearly from my school days…

The Relationship Between Author and Editor: How to Make it Work

Posted in creativity, discipline, Editors, Getting published, how to complete a novel, Independent Publishing, Learning to Write, Publishing, self publishing, Writing a novel, and Writing Tips

Making the Writer/Editor Relationship Work Let’s talk about the relationship between author and editor. After all, whether you’re traditionally or independently published, the relationship you have with your editor is probably essential in deciding whether or not you have success with your writing. I’m going to look at…